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Canada leads G7 in number of working-age university, college graduates: census

Students in a social studies program attend a lecture at Dalhousie University in November 2022. Newly released census numbers say that Canada leads the G7 in the number of working-age adults with a university or college degree. (Robert Short/CBC)

Students in a social studies program attend a lecture at Dalhousie University in November 2022. Newly released census numbers say that Canada leads the G7 in the number of working-age adults with a university or college degree.

Photo:  (Robert Short/CBC)

RCI

More adults studying for a degree combined with steady influx of highly educated immigrants

Canada has more working age college or university graduates than any other country in the G7 thanks to more adults studying for a degree and the steady influx of highly educated immigrants, according to newly released census data. 

Among working-age Canadians aged 25 to 64, some 57.5 per cent have a university or college degree, the highest in the G7.

Data released through the 2021 census says that ranking is due in part to the one in four working-age Canadians that have a college diploma or certificate qualification. 

When it comes to the percentage of working-age Canadians with a university degree, Canada sits in fourth place in the G7 at 32.9 per cent after the United Kingdom, at 41.3 per cent, the United States at 39.5 per cent and Japan at 34.2 per cent. 

The census also says that while the population is comparatively well-educated, failing to recognize the qualifications of workers educated abroad is leaving talent on the table.

More to come.

Peter Zimonjic (new window) · CBC News

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