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III - Past elections

1984 Federal Election Night set with several desks equipped with computers.

Le décor de l’émission spéciale «Élections 1984» met en scène le fourmillement de l’équipe de production.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Guy Dubois

RCI

An important amendment to Canada’s Election Act became law in 2007. Under the amended Elections Act, elections must be called for the third Monday in October, four years after the previous general election.

As the last general election was on September 20, 2021, the next federal election will be held on the third Monday in October 2025. However, opposition parties can still force an earlier election if a minority government is defeated on a confidence vote.

Now, who have Canadians voted for from the first Parliament in 1867 to the 44th Canadian Parliament?

Check out the results of all general elections from 1867 to 2019 below:

GENERAL ELECTION OF SEPTEMBER 20, 2021

Liberal

160

32,6 %

Conservative

119

33,7 %

Bloc québécois

32

7,6 %

New Democratic party (NDP)

25

17,8 %

Green Party

2

2,3 %

People's Party of Canada (PPC)

0

5,0 %

Independant

0

0,3 %

Approximate turnout: 62.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: Radio-Canada

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 21, 2019

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

157

33,1 %

Conservative

121

34,4 %

NDP

32

15,9 %

Bloc québécois

24

7,7 %

Green Party

3

6,5 %

Independents

1

0,4 %

PPC

0

1,6 %

Turnout: 67%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Justin Trudeau and his wife, Sophie Gregoire, celebrate the Liberal Party of Canada's victory in the October 20, 2015 general election.

Justin Trudeau's Liberals won the 2015 federal election after starting the campaign in third place.

Photo: Reuters / Chris Wattie

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 19, 2015

Liberal

184

39,7 %

Conservative

99

31,9 %

NDP

44

19.7 %

Bloc québécois

10

4.7 %

Green Party

1

3,5 %

Turnout: 68.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF MAY 2, 2011

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Conservative

166

39,6 %

NDP

103

30,6 %

Liberal

34

18,9 %

Bloc québécois

4

6,1 %

Green Party

1

3,9 %

Turnout: 61.1%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 14, 2008

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Consevative

143

37,7 %

Liberal

77

26,3 %

Bloc québécois

49

10 %

NDP

37

18,2 %

Independent

2

0,6 %

Turnout: 58.8%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Stephen Harper waves his hand.

Conservative Stephen Harper was Canada's prime minister from February 6, 2006 to November 4, 2015.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / Jonathan Hayward

GENERAL ELECTION OF JANUARY 23, 2006

Conservative

124

36,3 %

Liberal

103

30,2 %

Bloc québécois

34

10,5 %

NDP

4

17,5 %

Independent

1

0,5 %

Turnout: 64.7%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 28, 2004

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

135

36,7 %

Conservative

99

29,6 %

Bloc québécois

54

12,4 %

NDP

19

15,7 %

Independent

1

0,3 %

Turnout: 60.9%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Paul Martin poses for a photo.

Liberal Paul Martin was prime minister from 2003 to 2006.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / Adrian Wyld (archives)

GENERAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 27, 2000

Liberal

172

40,8 %

Canadian Alliance

66

25,5 %

Bloc québécois

38

10,7 %

NDP

13

8,5 %

Progressive Conservative

12

12,2 %

Turnout: 61.2%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: Service documentaire de Radio-Canada

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 2, 1997

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

155

38,5 %

Reform Party

60

19,4 %

Bloc québécois

44

10,7 %

NDP

21

11 %

Progressive Conservative

20

18,8 %

Independent

1

1,6 %

Turnout: 67%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Jean Chrétien raises his fist in the air.

Jean Chrétien at his re-election as Canada's prime minister on June 2, 1997, in Shawinigan. He led the country from 1993 to 2003.

Photo: Getty Images / AFP / André Pichette

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 25, 1993

Liberal

177

41,3 %

Bloc québécois

54

13,5 %

Reform Party

52

18,7 %

NDP

9

6,9 %

Progressive Conservative

2

16 %

Independent

1

3,6 %

Turnout: 69.6%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 21, 1988

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Progressive Conservative

169

43,02 %

Liberal

83

31,92 %

NDP

43

20,38 %

Turnout: 75.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Brian Mulroney in 1983

Conservative Brian Mulroney was prime minister from 1984 to 1993.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / La Presse canadienne/Ian Barrett

GENERAL ELECTION OF SEPTEMBER 4, 1984

Progressive Conservative

211

50,03 %

Liberal

40

28,02 %

NDP

30

18,81 %

Other

1

2,99 %

Turnout: 75.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF FEBRUARY 18, 1980

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

147

44,34 %

Progressive Conservative

103

32,45 %

NDP

32

19,78 %

Turnout: 69.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: Service documentaire de Radio-Canada

Joe Clark extends his arms to the sky in front of a crowd.

Joe Clark won the Progressive Conservative leadership race in 1976. The youngest prime minister in Canadian history, he was elected in 1979 before being defeated the following year in a motion of non-confidence on a tax program.

Photo: La Presse canadienne

GENERAL ELECTION OF MAY 22, 1979

Progressive Conservative

136

35,89 %

Liberal

114

40,11 %

NDP

26

17,88 %

Social Credit

6

4,61 %

Turnout: 75.7%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JULY 8, 1974

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

141

43,16 %

Progressive Conservative

95

35,44 %

NDP

16

15,44 %

Social Credit

11

5,06 %

Other

1

0,90 %

Turnout: 71%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Surrounded by a crowd, Pierre Elliott Trudeau raises his hands in victory.

Pierre Elliott Trudeau when elected leader of the Liberal Party on April 7, 1968. He was Canada's prime minister from 1968 to 1979 and from 1980 to 1984.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / CHUCK MITCHELL

GENERAL ELECTION OF JULY 8, 1972

Liberal

109

38,4 %

Progressive Conservative

107

35,0 %

NDP

31

17,8 %

Social Credit

15

7,6 %

Other

2

0,6 %

Turnout: 76,7 %. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 25, 1968

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

155

45,5 %

Progressive Conservative

72

31,4 %

NDP

22

17 %

Other

15

4,88 %

Turnout: 75.7%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 8, 1965

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

131

39,76 %

Progressive Conservative

97

32,06 %

NDP

21

17,72 %

Other

11

5,77 %

Turnout: 74.8%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Lester B. Pearson stands smiling next to an airplane.

Liberal Lester B. Pearson was Canada's prime minister from 1963 to 1968.

Photo: Getty Images / Roger Jackson

GENERAL ELECTION OF APRIL 8, 1963

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

129

41,7 %

Progressive Conservative

95

32,9 %

Social Credit

24

11,9 %

NDP

17

13,1 %

Turnout: 79.2%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 18, 1962

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Progressive Conservative

116

37,3 %

Liberal

99

37,4 %

Social Credit

30

11,7 %

NDP

19

13,4 %

Other

1

0,2 %

Turnout: 79%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF MARCH 31, 1958

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Progressive Conservative

208

53,7 %

Liberal

49

33,8 %

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF)

8

9,5 %

Turnout: 79.4%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

John Diefenbaker behind a CBC microphone

Conservative John Diefenbaker was prime minister from 1957 to 1963.

Photo: Radio-Canada

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 10, 1957

Progressive Conservative

112

39 %

Liberal

105

42,3 %

CCF

25

10,8 %

Social Credit

19

6,6 %

Other

4

1,3 %

Turnout: 74.1%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF AUGUST 10, 1953

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

171

50 %

Progressive Conservative

51

31 %

CCF

23

11,3 %

Social Credit

15

5,4 %

Other

4

2,3 %

Turnout: 67.5%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Louis St-Laurent stands next to the Canadian coat of arms.

Louis St-Laurent in 1948. Leader of the Liberal Party, he was prime minister from 1948 to 1957.

Photo: BAnQ / BAnQ/Armour Landry

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 27, 1949

Liberal

190

50,1 %

Progressive Conservative

41

29,7 %

CCF

13

13,4 %

Social Credit

10

2,4 %

Other

8

4,4 %

Turnout: 73.8%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 11, 1945

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

125

41,4 %

Progressive Conservative

67

27,7 %

CCF

28

15,7 %

Social Credit

13

4,1 %

Other (including the Bloc populaire)

12

11,1 %

Turnout: 75.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

The four men are talking to each other with the Château Frontenac and the St. Lawrence River in the background.

Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Canadian Governor General Alexander Cambridge Earl of Athlone and U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt at the Quebec Conference in 1943. The Canadian leader led the country from 1921 to 1926, from 1926 to 1930 and from 1935 to 1948.

Photo: Imperial War Museum- wiki

GENERAL ELECTION OF MARCH 26, 1940

Liberal

178

54,9 %

Progressive Conservative

39

30,6 %

Social Credit

10

n.b.

Other

10

6 %

CCF

8

8,5 %

Turnout: 69.9%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 14, 1935

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

171

44,4 %

Conservative

39

29,8 %

Social Credit

17

4,1 %

Other (including the Progressive Party)

11

12,8 %

CCF

7

8,9 %

Turnout: 74.2%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Richard Bedford Bennett holds the arm of William Lyon Mackenzie King in an archive photo.

Prime Minister Richard Bedford Bennett holds the arm of former Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in Toronto in 1933. Conservative Richard B. Bedford led Canada from 1930 to 1935.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / NELSON QUARRINGTON

GENERAL ELECTION OF JULY 28, 1930

Conservative

137

49 %

Liberal

91

43,9 %

Other (including the Progressive Party)

17

7,1 %

Turnout: 73.5%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF SEPTEMBER 14, 1926

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

116

43,6 %

Conservative

91

46,2 %

Other (including the Progressive Party)

38

10,2 %

Turnout: 67.7%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 29, 1925

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Conservative

116

46,6 %

Liberal

99

40,4 %

Other (including the Progressive Party)

38

13 %

Turnout: 66.4%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF DECEMBER 6, 1921

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

116

40,7 %

Conservative

50

30,3 %

Other (including the Progressive Party)

69

29 %

Turnout: 67.7%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Robert Borden poses in a black and white photo.

Conservative Robert Laird Borden was Canada's prime minister from 1911 to 1920, including during the First World War.

Photo: Getty Images / Hulton Archive

GENERAL ELECTION OF DECEMBER 17, 1917

Conservative

153

57 %

Liberal

82

40,1 %

Turnout: 75%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF SEPTEMBER 21, 1911

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Conservative

133

51,2 %

Liberal

86

47,8 %

Other

2

1 %

Turnout: 70.2%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF OCTOBER 26, 1908

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

133

50,6 %

Conservative

85

47 %

Other

3

2,4 %

Turnout: 70.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Archive photo of Wilfrid Laurier posing.

Canadian Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier in 1906. The Liberal led the country from 1896 to 1911.

Photo: British Library

GENERAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 3, 1904

Liberal

139

52,5 %

Conservative

75

46,9 %

Turnout:71.6%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 7, 1900

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

132

52 %

Conservative

81

47,4 %

Turnout: 77.4%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Sir Mackenzie Bowell poses on an archive photo.

Prime Minister Sir Mackenzie Bowell in 1896 in Ottawa. He led Canada from 1894 to 1896.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / WILLIAM JAMES TOPLEY

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 23, 1896

Liberal

118

45,1 %

Conservative

88

46,3 %

Other

7

8,6 %

Turnout: 62.9%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Sir John Sparrow David Thompson poses seated in an archive photo.

Prime Minister Sir John Sparrow David Thompson in January 1879 in Ottawa. He led Canada from 1892 to 1894.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / WILLIAM JAMES TOPLEY

GENERAL ELECTION OF MARCH 5, 1891

Conservative

123

52 %

Liberal

92

46,4 %

Independent

2

1,6 %

Turnout: 64.4%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

John Joseph Caldwell Abbott poses seated in an archive photo.

Prime Minister John Joseph Caldwell Abbott in February 1892. He led Canada from 1891 to 1892.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / WILLIAM JAMES TOPLEY

GENERAL ELECTION OF FEBRUARY 22, 1887

Conservative

123

50,7 %

Liberal

92

48,9 %

Turnout: 70.1%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JUNE 20, 1882

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Conservative

139

53,4 %

Liberal

71

46,6 %

Turnout: 70.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF SEPTEMBER 17, 1878

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Conservative

137

53,2 %

Liberal

69

45,1 %

Turnout: 69.1%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF JANUARY 22, 1874

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Liberal

133

53,8 %

Conservative

73

45,4 %

Turnout: 69.6%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

Sir John A Macdonald standing in his office.

Sir John A. Macdonald was Canada's prime minister from 1867 to 1873 and from 1878 to 1891.

Photo: Archive

GENERAL ELECTION OF JULY 20 TO OCTOBER 12, 1872

Conservative

103

49,9 %

Liberal

97

49,1 %

Turnout: 70.3%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

GENERAL ELECTION OF AUGUST 7 TO SEPTEMBER 20,  1867 (VOTING LASTED SEVERAL WEEKS)

PARTY

MPs

% OF VOTE

Conservative

101

50 %

Liberal

80

49 %

Turnout: 73.1%. The percentages do not determine the outcome of the election; it is the total number of elected officials that determines the winning party.

Source: CBC/Radio-Canada Libraries and Archives

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