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Parliament to return on November 22 with focus on vaccine mandate — PMO

Vaccinations, paid sick leave and conversion therapy ban at the top of government's to-do list

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in news release Friday morning that he has reached out to opposition leaders to discuss priorities.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in news release Friday morning that he has reached out to opposition leaders to discuss priorities.

Photo: La Presse canadienne / Adrian Wyld

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Parliament will return on Nov. 22, the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) announced Friday morning in a news release.

From finishing the fight against COVID-19 to getting the job done on $10-a-day child care for families across the country, Canadians chose to move forward in September, Trudeau said in a release from the PMO.

Together, we will keep working hard to beat this virus and get Canadians vaccinated, create jobs and grow the middle class, put home ownership back in reach, accelerate climate action, and take important steps forward on the path of reconciliation.

Cabinet will be sworn in on Oct. 26, as previously reported by CBC News (new window).

Among the early priorities for the government are vaccinations — ensuring that everyone 12 or older travelling by plane or train is fully vaccinated, as well as all federal employees and workers in federally regulated industries. 

The government will also deliver on its commitments to establish a standardized proof of vaccination for Canadians travelling internationally while supporting provincial and territorial proof-of-vaccination programs, and introduce legislation to make it a criminal offence to harass or threaten health-care workers, the release said.

The government is also putting priority on a conversion therapy ban, 10 days of paid sick leave for federally regulated workers, and engaging provinces and territories who have not yet signed on to the government's $10-a-day child-care agreement.

Trudeau has reached out to opposition leaders to discuss shared priorities, according to the release. He will speak with them by phone early next week.

 Among the first orders of business will be working with all parties to ensure all Members of Parliament in the House of Commons are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, the release said. Canadians expect their elected representatives to lead by example in the fight against this virus, and the Prime Minister will be raising this with other leaders.

The Liberals were re-elected with a minority government in September, meaning they will have to rely on opposition parties to get legislation passed in Parliament.

The PMO says the government is willing to work with other parties, particularly on extending COVID-19 economic support benefits.

The government is committed to finding common ground with, and to working alongside, our parliamentary colleagues to ensure Canadians continue to be protected from the virus and receive the support they need, the release said.

From finishing the fight against COVID-19 to getting the job done on $10-a-day child care for families across the country, Canadians chose to move forward in September, Trudeau said in a release from the PMO.

Together, we will keep working hard to beat this virus and get Canadians vaccinated, create jobs and grow the middle class, put home ownership back in reach, accelerate climate action, and take important steps forward on the path of reconciliation.

Cabinet will be sworn in on Oct. 26, as previously reported by CBC News (new window).

Among the early priorities for the government are vaccinations — ensuring that everyone 12 or older travelling by plane or train is fully vaccinated, as well as all federal employees and workers in federally regulated industries. 

The government will also deliver on its commitments to establish a standardized proof of vaccination for Canadians travelling internationally while supporting provincial and territorial proof-of-vaccination programs, and introduce legislation to make it a criminal offence to harass or threaten health-care workers, the release said.

The government is also putting priority on a conversion therapy ban, 10 days of paid sick leave for federally regulated workers, and engaging provinces and territories who have not yet signed on to the government's $10-a-day child-care agreement.

Trudeau has reached out to opposition leaders to discuss shared priorities, according to the release. He will speak with them by phone early next week.

 Among the first orders of business will be working with all parties to ensure all Members of Parliament in the House of Commons are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, the release said. Canadians expect their elected representatives to lead by example in the fight against this virus, and the Prime Minister will be raising this with other leaders.

The Liberals were re-elected with a minority government in September, meaning they will have to rely on opposition parties to get legislation passed in Parliament.

The PMO says the government is willing to work with other parties, particularly on extending COVID-19 economic support benefits.

The government is committed to finding common ground with, and to working alongside, our parliamentary colleagues to ensure Canadians continue to be protected from the virus and receive the support they need, the release said.

Richard Raycraft (new window) · CBC News

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