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Why some Canadians are ready to travel; landlord boots tenant over tattoos: CBC’s Marketplace cheat sheet

Why some Canadians are ready to travel; landlord boots tenant over tattoos: CBC's Marketplace cheat sheet

A row of beach chairs in Varadero, Cuba, is empty of sun-seekers in March 2021. Cuba is relaxing restrictions for incoming Canadian tourists starting in mid-November.

A row of beach chairs in Varadero, Cuba, is empty of sun-seekers in March 2021. Cuba is relaxing restrictions for incoming Canadian tourists starting in mid-November.

Photo: (Ramon Espinosa/The Associated Press)

RCI

For many Canadians accustomed to a life of travel, the last year and half has only made their feelings of wanderlust grow stronger.

While the delta variant has complicated plans for a post-pandemic future where it's safe to travel without reservations, many people are still planning to head south in the coming months.

Air Canada, Air Transat and Sunwing all say the upcoming fall and winter looks promising for travel to sun destinations.

When looking to the sun market, we are very optimistic about our recovery, Air Canada spokesperson Peter Fitzpatrick told CBC News in a recent email. He noted the airline is currently observing demand growth that is above 2019 levels.

Despite this increased demand, the federal government is still feeling uneasy about people travelling internationally.

In an email to CBC News, Global Affairs Canada said its still advising against non-essential travel outside of Canada and also pointed to practical concerns for those who do choose to go abroad.

Additional travel restrictions can be imposed suddenly. Airlines can suspend or reduce flights without notice. Travel plans may be severely disrupted, making it difficult to return home. Read more (new window)

Can a landlord cancel a lease because of tattoos? It happened to this student

A first-year Western University student who arrived in London, Ont., from Saskatchewan says she had a rental agreement cancelled at the last minute by a landlord who said she didn't like her tattoos. 

Kadince Ball, 18, started school at Western earlier this month and secured an apartment ahead of her move. She'd already signed a lease and paid her damage deposit, but shortly after she met her landlord Esther Lee in person, Lee told her that she couldn't move in.

A lease was signed and because I look a certain way, I was denied tenancy, said Ball. None of my tattoos are offensive. They are works of art. They are somebody's works of art on my body. 

Lee told CBC News she moved to cancel the lease because she became scared after seeing Ball's tattoos. The day the two first met in person, it was hot and Ball was wearing a tank top that showed her tattoos, which include a snake wrapped around a flower on her forearm, a cherub on one shoulder and a flower on the other shoulder 

"It covered almost 70 per cent of her arm," said Lee. "That's why I don't want to rent it to her because it's scary, so scary."

Ball eventually found another apartment. She's more concerned with her studies than pursuing legal action. But a lawyer at the Community Legal Services Clinic at Western says if she chose to bring the incident to small claims court, she likely would have a case. Read more (new window)

Kadince Ball signed a lease for an apartment in London, Ont., before arriving from Saskatchewan for her first year at Western University. When she met the landlord in person, the landlord said she wouldn't rent to her. She later told CBC News it was because of Ball's tattoos.

Kadince Ball signed a lease for an apartment in London, Ont., before arriving from Saskatchewan for her first year at Western University. When she met the landlord in person, the landlord said she wouldn't rent to her. She later told CBC News it was because of Ball's tattoos.

Photo:  (Andrew Lupton/CBC)

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